91-year old gets hip replacement!

Yes, that’s correct. My 91-year old, feisty, Irish client just got a hip replacement. The orthopedic surgeon said in another country with a different healthcare system, she would probably not be able to have this surgery. The hip will surely outlive her, but this was a matter of quality-of-life.

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Senior living options: when “FREE” is not really free

You’ve probably seen the ads on TV with a famous person promoting “free placement” services for Mom or Dad. Sounds great right? But consumers don’t realize these service are not actually free. The consultant—aka placement service—gets paid a commission by the facilities they contract with. That commission is the equivalent of a full month’s rent. That is a considerable sum, reaching as high as $9,000-$10,000 here in the Northeast.

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Unearthing and Burying Ancient Sibling Rivalries

Many adult children I encounter who are taking care of their aging parents, struggle to work together with their siblings. Relationship issues from childhood return when faced with the need to collaborate and communicate about parents.

In what becomes a form of role reversal, adult children find themselves needing to get involved in healthcare, finances, and day-to-day care needs of those who once cared for them.

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Expect the Unexpected: Advice for Adults with Aging Parents

Nobody has a crystal ball that will tell us who will have a sudden or chronic illness, an accident or injury and when these things might occur. So as we watch our loved ones age, be proactive and get prepared.

Here are some important and practical things to know and do so that when/if a crisis hits, you will be better equipped to make decisions in a fast-paced stressful situation.

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The Importance of Having End of Life Conversations

Recently, a very frail client I have known for many years entered the hospital with a serious and sudden health crisis. She was 89, had survived cancer, a stroke, and lived with the debilitating results of Parkinson’s Disease for over 15 years. She needed 24-hr care and assistance with everything, but was cognitively sharp most of the time.

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